Landing Image_Detail_Scape Series 01 (1).jpg
Landing Image_Detail_Scape Series 01 (1).jpg

Anchor Ceramics


Anchor Ceramics explores the dimensional possibilities of clay. The studio makes ceramic objects that enrich the senses and our quality of space. We consciously design and form objects to evolve with use. Our work is elemental, connected to people and the earth.

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Anchor Ceramics


Anchor Ceramics explores the dimensional possibilities of clay. The studio makes ceramic objects that enrich the senses and our quality of space. We consciously design and form objects to evolve with use. Our work is elemental, connected to people and the earth.

Lighting


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Lighting


LIGHTING

Luminous texture. Refined handmade forms.

Anchor’s lighting collection is purposefully designed to show the inherent beauty of the clay bodies we use to make our light fittings. The range is handmade using a number of artisanal manufacturing methods. Some of these methods are as old as ceramics themselves, while others marry traditional pottery techniques with contemporary tools and techniques. Through these handmade processes, each light fitting we make is unique; an object with a carefully considered form and a surface rich with the evidence of its handmade origins.

We are currently producing four collections of lighting products. The Potter Light, a pendant range in varying sizes and finishes. The Potter Halo, pendants made using a delicate translucent porcelain and the Earth Light, a fitting that is made in two sizes of wall light and matching pendant formats. Our latest release, the Potter DS, is a wall and pendant light that blends the best of traditional, hand-made pottery techniques with cutting edge digital technologies.

 

Planters


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Planters


PLANTERS

Wheel thrown geometric forms.

Anchor planters are handmade in limited quantities in Melbourne, Australia. Thrown by hand on a potter’s wheel, each planter we make is a unique object. A designed container for your treasured plants with a carefully considered form and a surface rich with the textural evidence of its handmade origins.

The planters were originally conceived in terracotta and as a reworking of the ubiquitous terracotta pots and pipes typically found in Australian gardens. The planter range has since evolved to include two different forms, six sizes, five earthy glaze options and terracotta. 

Each glaze finish is the result of relentless testing and refinement and is designed to complement both the clean geometric forms of the planters and the plants that will ultimately nest within the form. Each glaze has a natural compatibility with the broad colour spectrum and foliage of the plant world. The glaze colours are also designed to integrate and complement other objects created in the Anchor studio.

 

Object


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Object


OBJECT

 Architectural Hardware

Architectural Hardware

 Pet Bowls

Pet Bowls

 U-Cut Vase

U-Cut Vase

 Anchor Table

Anchor Table

Form and material exploration in clay.

We work on clay time. Far from an industrial or automated process, the works take considerable time to make by hand and yet many of our processes employ current technologies and techniques. The objects go through careful making stages with long drying times, multiple ceramic phases and firings. The forms are created using thrown, constructed and extruded ceramic processes. The specific nature of a clay body's texture, colour and grain are celebrated in the design, never concealed. No single part of the process can be skipped or harried.

Colour is significant factor in our process and often glazes are applied to the surface of the forms we are making. The glazes have evolved through years of testing and development to find just the right balance between hue, tone, transparency, durability and gloss level.

Our studio practices have been formed over time; they are integrated and consistent throughout the stages of our design process. Working with clay as a material keeps our studio present, future focused and at the same time connected to the rich history of making that spans different disciplines and eras. Creative risk-taking is an inherent method in realising the objects.Sometimes we work with a brief, sometimes we self-initiate work, we collaborate and commission, and we are commissioned. Material decisions are a constant in this process and are central to realising a three dimensional sensorial object. These are some examples.